9 elements you need to have on your sales page

Learn what to include on your sales page and how to structure it so your ideal clients can't help but click that buy button!

Creating your first (or next) sales page takes a lot of time, especially if you count everything from market research to decide your offer to copywriting, design, and connecting all the tech for payments and automated emails. A lot of coaches struggle not just with how their sales page should look (how to decide your brand colors and fonts for your website), but also wonder what the anatomy of a high-converting sales page is. Here’s what to include on your sales page and how to structure it so your ideal clients can’t help but click that buy button!

Want to keep this handy, including a quick visual overview? Get my free Sales Page Blueprint:

1. Opening Headline

This is the single most important sentence of your entire page. It needs to grab their attention and make them want to read more. Talk about the pain point OR what they desire (the painkiller).

Optional: Add a subhead and some body copy or bullets to expand on the pain point (or painkiller).

2. Opposite Headline

If you talked about their pain point, give them the painkiller now… or vice versa.

Optional: Add a subhead and some body copy or bullets to expand on the painkiller (or pain point).

Examples of Opening and Opposite Headlines:
You’re still [pain point] / What if it doesn’t have to be that way?
or
You want to [desire] / But right now, [pain point]

3. Introducing your offer

You’ve shown them you understand their frustrations and now it’s time to share your solution. Give them all the details they need: what’s they’ll learn, what they get, etc. Focus first on the benefits and second on the features.

4. Make the offer

Tell them what to do next, how to buy, the options, the price and anything else they need to know. This is the most important section of your sales page and should stand out no matter how fast they’re scrolling.

5. Call to Action

Include CTA buttons several times throughout your sales page, wherever it makes sense. Use a contrasting color from the rest of your page to make sure your buttons stand out.

6. Testimonials

Show your reader proof that your offer works. Highlight successes of previous clients or customers, or if it’s a brand-new offer, use testimonials that speak to how you’ve solved similar issues for people before. Sprinkle testimonials throughout your sales page, or put them all together.

7. Introduce Yourself

Tell your reader who you are and why you’re qualified to help them solve this problem.

8. Who your offer is for/not for

This section is mostly to confirm to your reader this offer is for them, but it will also filter out the wrong people.

9. FAQs

Answer any questions or objections your reader may have about your offer.

Want to keep this handy, including a quick visual overview of the structure? Get the free Sales Page Blueprint below!

anouska-hi

I'm Anouska

I help coaches & course creators to stop struggling with code and Canva. You can spend your time and energy showing up for your audience, doing what only you can do to make your launch successful. Learn more.

Planning to launch soon?
Get my free Sales Page Blueprint!

Learn what to include on your sales page and how to structure it so your ideal clients can't help but click that buy button!

Planning to launch soon? Get my free Sales Page Blueprint!

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